Welcome to dreammean.net

Unlock the Mysteries of Your Dreams with DreamMean.net

Journey Into the Depths of Your Dreams

Welcome to dreammean.net, your gateway to unraveling the mysteries concealed within your dreams. Our dream dictionary stands as an ever-evolving compendium, meticulously curated to ensure accuracy and pertinence.

Delve into the realm of dream symbolism, meanings, and the art of interpretation with our unparalleled resources. Navigate through our lucid and accessible dream encyclopedia designed to enlighten seekers of all levels.

Who We Are

At Dream Interpret, we fervently believe in guiding you toward deciphering the enigmatic messages embedded within your dreams. With a devoted team of experts, we endeavor to furnish you with the most exhaustive dream interpretation resources imaginable.

Unlock Dream Meanings

Our dream dictionary serves as your compass in navigating the intricate landscapes of dream symbolism. Immerse yourself in a vast repository of symbols and their interpretations, granting you profound insights into the recesses of your subconscious.

Decipher Your Dreams

Unveil the veiled narratives of your dreams through our comprehensive resources on dream interpretation. Whether you're a novice or an adept analyst, our content will enrich your comprehension of the ethereal realm of dreams.

Nightmares and scary dreams: frightening dreams are your friend

Even Nightmares Have a Helpful Purpose. A nightmare is easy to recognize: You wake up feeling anythi...

Types of dreams

Daydreams Studies show that we all have the tendency to daydream an average of 70-120 minutes a day....


Reflections on the Butterfly Dream

In the hushed chambers of slumber, I once found myself entranced within a reverie where I, a butterfly, danced upon the zephyrs, knowing nothing but the pure ecstasy of my fluttering existence. Wrapped in the ephemeral cloak of the butterfly, I knew naught of my human self. But then, as dawn's gentle fingers stirred me from my nocturnal odyssey, I awoke to the stark reality of my human form. Now, ensconced in wakefulness, I ponder: was I truly a man dreaming I was a butterfly, or am I now, in this waking life, but a butterfly dreaming of humanity?

Famous dreams

Through the centuries, the dreaming mind has been credited with being the source of ideas, insights, revelations and guidance, some of which have changed the course of history. Here are just a few well- known examples:

Julius Caesar’s decision to cross the Rubicon is attributed to a dream in which he saw himself in bed with his mother (Mother Rome, the seers told him). His assassination was foretold in his wife’s Calpurnia’s dream. ‘She held him in her arms, bleeding and stabbed.’ Another Caesar, Caesar Augustus, is said to have walked the streets as a beggar because of instructions he received in a dream.

St Francis of Assisi founded the Franciscan Order because of a dream in which Jesus Christ spoke from the cross, telling him to ‘go set my house in order’.

Dante relates that the whole story of The Divine Comedy was revealed to him in a dream on Good Friday in 1300. When he died in 1321, part of the manuscript was lost. His son Jocojso found the manuscript after a dream in which his father showed him where to look.

Genghis Khan is reported to have received his battle plans from his dreams. He is also reported to have been told in a dream that he was a chosen one.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s famous poem, ‘Kubla Khan’, was written upon awakening from an opium-affected dream.

Robert Louis Stephenson believed that his best stories came from his dreams. He reported that the theme for Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was derived from a dream. He also reported other breakthroughs in his writing that came from his dreams. He suffered as a child from nightmares and learned to control his dreams to change the nightmares. He said he used his dreams to revise plays and stories while asleep.

Abraham Lincoln dreamt, days before his assassination, of great cries coming from the East Wing of the White House. When he investigated, he was told by soldiers on guard that they weeping for the president who had been assassinated. Days later, his body was held in state in the East Wing so people could pay their last respects.

Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz was a chemist working on the chemical structure of benzene. He reported that he got fed up with his data, which made no sense interpreted as a ‘long string’ molecule. He was dozing in his comfy chair when he was startled by the image of a snake biting its own tail. He woke and worked out the mathematics of the benzene molecule as a ring rather than a long string.

Guiseppe Tartini (Italian violinist and composer) composed one of his greatest works, ‘The Devil’s Trill’, as a result of a dream he had in 1713. In the dream, he handed his violin to the devil himself, who began to ‘play with consummate skill a sonata of such exquisite beauty as surpassed the boldest flights of my imagination. I felt enraptured, transported, enchanted; my breath was taken away, and I awoke. Seizing my violin I tried to retain the sounds I had heard. But it was in vain. The piece I then composed...was the best I ever wrote, but how far below the one I heard in my dream!’

Elias Howe, the inventor of the sewing machine, wrote that he got the core idea, the breakthrough concept, from a dream. It was a nightmare. He had been captured by cannibals. They were preparing to cook him and they were dancing around the fire waving their spears. Howe noticed at the head of each spear there was a small hole through the shaft, and the up and down motion of the spears and the hole remained with him when he woke. The idea of passing the thread through the needle close to the point, not at the other end, was a major innovation in making mechanical sewing possible.

Niels Bohr reported that he developed the model of the atom based on a dream of sitting on the sun with all the planets hissing around on tiny cords.

Paul McCartney heard a haunting melody in one of his dreams, confirmed that none of the Beatles had heard it before, and wrote it down. It became the tune for the famous song, ‘Yesterday’....


Common Dream Interpretations

Snake Dream Meaning
Apple Dream Meaning
Dog Dream Meaning
Death Dream Meaning
Coffin Dream Meaning
Water Dream Meaning
Fire Dream Meaning
Money Dream Meaning
Cow Dream Meaning
Baby Dream Meaning
Sea Dream Meaning
Shoes Dream Meaning
Fish Dream Meaning
Car Dream Meaning
Cake Dream Meaning
Hair Dream Meaning
Blood Dream Meaning
Cat Dream Meaning
Numbers Dream Meaning
Train Dream Meaning
Horse Dream Meaning
Lion Dream Meaning
Wedding Dream Meaning
Flying Dream Meaning
House Dream Meaning
Snow Dream Meaning
Gun Dream Meaning
Pregnant Dream Meaning
Duck Dream Meaning
Falling Dream Meaning
Blue Dream Meaning
Bus Dream Meaning
Twins Dream Meaning
Rain Dream Meaning
Eye Dream Meaning
Mother Dream Meaning
Dancing Dream Meaning
Teeth Dream Meaning
Bear Dream Meaning
Friend Dream Meaning
Green Dream Meaning

'If the dream is a translation of waking life, waking life is also a translation of the dream.'
René Magritte
"Sleep is the balm for hurt minds, nature’s great second course."
William Shakespeare

sleeping boy

The dreams you seek from A to Z



Dream interpretation icon About Us

Dream interpretation icon Dream Interpretation

Dream dictionary icon Dream Dictionary

Dream encyclopedia icon Dream Encyclopedia

Dream interpretation icon Blog

dream favicon What is the dream?

Common dream icon Common Dreams

Top searches icon Top Searches

Recent Questions icon Recent Questions

A to Z Dream Interpretation